Sigourney Weaver
In the film Alien: Resurrection (1997) Sigourney actually managed to sink the basketball into the hoop backwards on the first take, even though she wasn't supposed to or intended to. The shot was almost ruined because Ron Perlman broke character because he was so amazed.
It took me a while to let my hair down in the business because I was kind of a shy person. I was from New York and never really felt at ease in Hollywood. I don't really now either but I don't care, it's not important that I do. Filmmakers find me or I find them.
Sigourney Weaver
Susan Alexandra Weaver
8 October 1949, New York City, New York
Sigourney Weaver (born Susan Alexandra Weaver; October 8, 1949) is an American actress best known for her role as Ellen Ripley in the Alien film series, a role for which she has received worldwide recognition. She is also known for her roles in the Ghostbusters films, Gorillas in the Mist, The Ice Storm, Working Girl, Holes, and Avatar.

Weaver is also a three-time Academy Award nominee for her performances in Aliens (1986), Gorillas in the Mist (1988), and Working Girl (1988) winning Golden Globe Awards in the latter two films. She has been called 'The Sci-Fi Queen' by many on account of her many science fiction and fantasy films.

Weaver was born in Manhattan, New York City, the daughter of Elizabeth Inglis (née Desiree Mary Lucy Hawkins; 1913–2007), an English actress, and the NBC television executive and television pioneer Sylvester "Pat" Laflin Weaver (1908–2002). Her uncle, Doodles Weaver, was a comedian and actor. She began using the name "Sigourney Weaver" in 1963 after a minor character (Sigourney Howard) in F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel The Great Gatsby.

Weaver attended the Ethel Walker School, a prep school in Simsbury, Connecticut, where she was made fun of all the time for being a nerd and for her height. She also attended The Chapin School. Sigourney was reportedly 5′ 10½″ (179 cm) tall by the age of 14, but she only grew another inch during her teens to her adult height of 5′ 11½″ (182 cm). Weaver graduated from Stanford University, with a bachelor of arts degree in English in 1972, but she had already begun her involvement in acting, by living in Stanford's co-ed Beta Chi Community for the Performing Arts. Weaver earned her Master of Fine Arts degree at the Yale University School of Drama in 1974, where one of her appearances was in the chorus in a production of Stephen Sondheim's musical version of The Frogs, and another was as one of a mob of Roman soldiers alongside Meryl Streep in another production. Weaver later acted in original plays by her friend and classmate Christopher Durang. She later appeared in an "Off Broadway" production of Durang's comedy Beyond Therapy in 1981, which was directed by the up-and-coming director Jerry Zaks.

Weaver's first role was in Woody Allen's 1977 comedy Annie Hall playing a minor role opposite Allen. Weaver appeared two years later as Warrant Officer/Lieutenant Ellen Ripley in the blockbuster Alien movie franchise, a role she is best known for. She first appeared as Ripley in Ridley Scott's 1979 film Alien. She reprised the role in three sequels, Aliens, Alien 3, and Alien Resurrection. Ty Burr of The Boston Globe states, "One of the real pleasures of "Alien" is to watch the emergence of both Ellen Ripley as a character and Sigourney Weaver as a star." In the sequel Aliens directed by James Cameron critic Roger Ebert exclaims, "Weaver, who is onscreen almost all the time, comes through with a very strong, sympathetic performance: She's the thread that holds everything together." She was nominated for a Best Actress Academy Award in Aliens, one of the very few actresses honored for a role in a science fiction film. Weaver followed the success of Aliens appearing opposite Mel Gibson in The Year of Living Dangerously released to critical acclaim and as Dana Barrett in Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters II.

By the end of the decade Weaver appeared in two of her most memorable and critically acclaimed performances in 1988 as Dian Fossey in Gorillas in the Mist. The same year she appeared opposite Harrison Ford in a supporting role as Katharine Parker in the film Working Girl. Weaver won Golden Globe awards for Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress for her two roles that year. She received two Academy Award nominations in 1988, for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Working Girl and Best Actress for Gorillas in the Mist making her one of the few actors nominated for two acting awards in the same year. By the early 1990's Weaver appeared in several films including Ang Lee's The Ice Storm earning her another Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actress and winning a BAFTA Award, followed by Dave opposite Kevin Kline and Frank Langella. She played the role of agoraphobic criminal psychologist Helen Hudson in the 1995 movie Copycat. Weaver also concentrated on smaller and supporting roles throughout the decade such as Jeffrey (1994), A Map of the World (1999) and Galaxy Quest (1999). In 2001 she appeared in the comedy Heartbreakers playing the lead role of a con artist alongside Jennifer Love Hewitt, Ray Liotta, Gene Hackman and Anne Bancroft.

In 2003, she was voted 20th in Channel 4's countdown of the 100 Greatest Movie Stars of All Time. She was one of only two women in the top 20 (the other was Audrey Hepburn). That year, she also played the Warden in the movie Holes. In 2004, she appeared in M. Night Shyamalan's horror film The Village. In 2006, Weaver returned to Rwanda for the BBC special Gorillas Revisited.

In 2009, Weaver starred as Mary Griffith in her first made-for-TV movie, Prayers for Bobby, for which she was nominated for an Emmy Award, Golden Globe Award and Screen Actors Guild Award. She also guest starred in the TV show Eli Stone in the fall of 2008. Weaver also played the role of a news reporter in the 2008 American film Vantage Point. She reunited with Aliens director James Cameron for his 2009 film Avatar with Weaver playing a major part as Dr. Grace Augustine, leader of the AVTR (avatar) program on the film's fictional moon Pandora. The film has the distinction of being the highest grossing film of all time.

Weaver has done voice work in television and film. She had a guest role in the Futurama episode "Love and Rocket" in February 2002, playing the female Planet Express Ship. In 2006, she was the narrator for the American version of the Emmy Award-winning series Planet Earth. Also in 2006, Weaver narrated "A Matter of Degrees", a short film that plays daily at The Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks (The Wild Center) in Tupper Lake, New York. In 2008, Weaver was featured as the voice of the ship's computer in the Pixar and Disney release, WALL•E. She also voiced a narrating role in another computer-animated film, 2008's The Tale of Despereaux, based on the novel by Kate DiCamillo. Weaver has also expressed interest in starring in a fifth Alien film. Ivan Reitman has confirmed that Weaver will reprise her role as Dana Barrett in the rumored third Ghostbusters movie due for release in 2012.

Weaver has hosted two episodes of the long-running NBC sketch show Saturday Night Live: once on the 12th season premiere in 1986, and again, on a season 35 episode in January, 2010. Weaver has now broken Madeline Kahn's record for longest gap between hosting appearances on SNL. Kahn had an 18-year gap between her second appearance in 1977 and her third and final appearance in 1995; Weaver, on the other hand, has a 24-year gap between her first appearance in 1986 and her second and most recent appearance in 2010. In March 2010, she was cast for the lead role as Queen of the Vampire in Amy Heckerling's Vamps. In May 2010, Weaver was cast for the lead role Margaret Matheson in the Spanish thriller film Red Lights.

Weaver was previously engaged to reporter Aaron Latham in 1967. She has been married to the filmmaker Jim Simpson since October 1, 1984. They are the parents of one daughter, Charlotte Simpson, who was born on April 13, 1990.

After making Gorillas in the Mist: The Story of Dian Fossey, she became a supporter of The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund and is now the DFGFI's honorary chairperson. Weaver is an environmentalist. In October 2006, she drew international attention through a news conference at the start of a United Nations General Assembly policy deliberation. She outlined the widespread threat to ocean habitats posed by deep-sea trawling, an industrial method for harvesting fish. She also narrated the American version of the BBC/Discovery Channel show Planet Earth. On April 8, 2008, she hosted the annual gala of the Trickle Up Program, a non-profit organization focusing on those in extreme poverty, mainly women and the disabled, in the Rainbow Room.
Chosen by Empire magazine as one of the 100 Sexiest Stars in film history (#81). [1995]

Attended the Ethel Walker School in Simsbury, CT.

Her dad Sylvester L. Weaver Jr. ("Pat" Weaver), NBC-TV president (1953- 55), pioneered the desk-and-couch talk show format that still survives on two programs he created - NBC's "Today" (1952) and "Tonight!" (1953) (aka "The Tonight Show") shows.

Ranked #71 in Empire (UK) magazine's "The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time" list. [October 1997]

Changed her name after reading "The Great Gatsby".

Debuted in Woody Allen 's Annie Hall (1977), duration: 6 seconds.

Family: Daughter of NBC-TV executive Sylvester L. Weaver Jr. ("Pat" Weaver) and actress Elizabeth Inglis, older brother, Trajan Weaver. Uncle, actor Doodles Weaver.

Afraid to travel in elevators.

#13 of Sci-Fi's Sexy 50, by Femme Fatales magazine. [1997]

Eye/hair color: brown

Speaks fluent French and German.

Graduated from Stanford University in 1972 with a bachelor's degree in English.

Born at 6:15 PM EST

Has one daughter, Charlotte Simpson, was born on 13 April 1990.

She is one of the elite eleven thespians to have been nominated for both a Supporting and Lead Acting Academy Award in the same year for their achievements in two different movies. The other nine are Fay Bainter, Teresa Wright, Barry Fitzgerald (he has been nominated in both categories for the same role in the same movie), Jessica Lange, Al Pacino, Emma Thompson, Holly Hunter, Julianne Moore, Jamie Foxx and Cate Blanchett.

Her salary for Alien: Resurrection (1997) was more than the entire cost of the original Alien (1979) movie.

Measurements: 34B-24-35 (Source: Celebrity Sleuth magazine)

Suffered nightmares for two weeks after reading the script for The Village (2004).

Was nominated for Broadway's 1985 Tony Award as Best Actress (Featured Role - Play) for David Rabe's "Hurlyburly," but lost to a co-star, Judith Ivey.

Has worked with three Bagginses. In Alien (1979) she works with Ian Holm, who played Frodo in the BBC radio adaptation and Bilbo in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). In The Ice Storm (1997) she worked with Elijah Wood, who played the part in the film. In Aliens (1986) the stunt double for Newt was Kiran Shah, who was also Wood's scale double.

Before working together on You Again (2010) she has co-starred with nine actors who have also co-starred with Jamie Lee Curtis: Ray Liotta, Dan Aykroyd, Kevin Kline, Tim Allen, J.E. Freeman, Mel Gibson, Elijah Wood, Philip Bosco and Bill Paxton. Both have co-starred with Michelle Williams. They have also both worked with composer John Ottman and director James Cameron.

In many of her roles her character has had to deal with artificially intelligent spaceships. In the "Alien" movies, she battles them. In Galaxy Quest (1999), much to her character's chagrin, she repeated whatever the spaceship said. In addition, on an episode of "Futurama" (1999), and in the film WALL·E (2008), she had the chance to voice a spaceship.

Member of jury at the Cannes Film Festival in 1998

Attended the Yale School of Drama

Remains in contact with her former Aliens (1986) co-star Carrie Henn.

Her performance as Ellen Ripley in Aliens (1986) is ranked #58 on Premiere Magazine's 100 Greatest Performances of All Time (2006).

Her performance as Ellen Ripley in the "Alien" quadrilogy is ranked #8 on Premiere Magazine's 100 Greatest Movie Characters of All Time.

Injured her knee during the shooting of Snow Cake (2006) and has been forced to stop exercising for a year.

Friend of Selina Cadell.

Ranked #20 on E4's 100 Greatest Movie Stars. She was the second highest female on the list behind #13 Audrey Hepburn.

Along with Sissy Spacek, Piper Laurie, Janet Leigh, Jodie Foster, Glenn Close, Kathy Bates, Eileen Heckart, Ruth Gordon, Patty McCormack, Nancy Kelly, Toni Collette, Ellen Burstyn and Linda Blair, she is one of the few actresses to have been nominated for an Oscar for a performance in a horror movie.

Singer/songwriter Mike Garrigan wrote a song entitled "Sigourney Weaver" that pays tribute to the actress.

Dana Barrett, her character in the Ghostbusters films, is the only character among the leads who did not appear in the animated adaptation, The Real Ghostbusters (1986).

Chosen by Empire magazine as one of the 100 Sexiest Stars in film history (#74). [2007].

Ranked #74 on Empires's 100 Sexiest Movie Stars. (2007).

Studied acting with Michael Howard in New York City.

Returned to work nine months after giving birth to her daughter Charlotte (at age 42) in order to begin filming Alien³ (1992).

Lives in New York City, New York and Santa Barbara, California.
I'd rather have a small part in a movie I love than a bigger part in one I don't care about.

Well, I've always admired Margaret Rutherford. Like her I'd like to play Miss Marple when I'm eighty.

I'm having a wonderful time producing. There are good producers and bad producers. I've learned the hard way what not to do. The ultimate aim is to produce things I'm not actually in. I'm not looking for vehicles for myself. It's not a vanity company.

Some of the most intense affairs are between actors and characters. There's a fire in the human heart and we jump into it with the same obsession as we have with our lovers.

I'd rather work with a first-time director who's passionate about the material. I've done enough movies with old and jaded people who are just like, "Let's get this over with."

I've always regretted having such a serious career because I'm really more of an idiot.

In Hollywood, if you are a man and speak your mind openly, you're considered a man in full. But, if you are a woman and do the same, you're nothing but an annoying bitch.

Usually all Hollywood wants you to do is what you just did. After The Ice Storm (1997) I was offered a thousand "Ice Storms" and so on. You always get offered the same thing again and again, if you're not very careful. It's up to you to swing back and forth.

I think I get sent the roles Meryl's [Meryl Streep] not doing.

These deep sea trawlers are operating beyond the reach of the law. It's up to all of us to change that.

Most people think somebody, somewhere is looking out for the deep oceans, but they aren't.

I've lost a lot of roles because of my height. I'm 6ft 3in in heels. Producers are short and I was never their sexual fantasy. As for actors, if I enter a room and an actor stands up then immediately gets self-conscious and sits back down, I hear myself saying, 'This job isn't for me'. I once offered to paint my shoes on my bare feet to get one part because it made me appear shorter.

I don't have ambitions, I believe in taking what comes. I have that philosophy about life in general. I go in and try to transform it into the best it can be.
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